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with 64 votes. we passed the hurricane sandy emergency relief bill also in bipartisan fashion, with 62 votes. we had open debate, we had discussions, we had amendments, and we passed legislation. particularly we passed by a powerful bipartisan vote of 89-8, a bill that avoided tax increases for 99% of americans and extended emergency unemployment benefits for another year and protected us from the fiscal cliff. when it comes to legislating, the senate actually has a pretty strong bipartisan record. how did those senate bills do on the house side? well, the house couldn't pass its own highway bill. congress has been doing highway bills since the eisenhower years. this isn't rocket science. the house couldn't do one. the best the house of representatives could do was to pass a short-term extension that allowed some of their members to get to conference on the senate bill. but they took no bill into conference because they couldn't pass one. even then they delayed the conference negotiations and they cost the united states of america an entire summer construction season for highway constr
year which also provided much-needed relief funds for hurricane sandy victims. that was a bipartisan bill. it was supported by senate republicans and democrats alike. but the republicans in the house regrettably gutted the bill and sent back legislation that explicitly cut out wildfire relief. in that context, let me make one point absolutely clear. this is an emergency. some people have questioned the need for funding and have asked why we wouldn't limit dollars to just hurricane sandy saer kwras like the bill -- hurricane sandy areas. the short answer is it is the fiscally smart thing to do, the right thing to do, and the fair thing to do. this bill is an emergency appropriations bill for all national disasters, not just hurricane sandy. it is our best hope of seeing wildfire relief. i emphatically note that the colorado emergencies occurred before hurricane sandy and the west should not have to continue to wait. very few emergency supplemental bills pass congress. this bill is passing now, and it should include aid for colorado and other states across our country. we as americans,
this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we have been through aurora, the sikh temple, the oregon shopping mall, think about this, this is before we got to sandy hook. in newtown. we'd had a time of ab
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
on hand and when sandy had, the amount paid out exceeded the cash on hand in our existing borrowing authority. so congress has to appropriate almost $9 billion so we could go out and borrow enough money to pay those claims off. who is paying the interest on that? who was ultimately sat with the data if the insurance policies never pay that off? do the taxpayer. you are the insurance come me. it's called the national flood insurance program. you are responsible for that exposure and at the point where fema can no longer borrow enough money for congress cannot find my money, we will build a payer claims that the fault, which means it will come back to you the taxpayer to make up the difference. why was the flood insurance program created in the first place? remember that saying about it might be assigned? from the private sector said the risk and exposure to flooding is greater than our ability to make returns for shareholders. first of all, insurance companies are not evil people. they have a job to do to manage risk in such a way they can provide coverage at a rate which they pay ou
we begin this discussioncomes out to you on personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, as in denver colorado on personal business and i was driving to the denver suburbs and i passed into oruro, colorado and saw the sign that to myself, as journalists often do, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago and a young man now appears to be utterly deranged, went to the theater and began shooting people with an assault weapon. and it went away. it is not part of a presidential debate, not part of the daily journalistic diet. so that wednesday night, i e-mailed the reduced their of the "meet the press" show coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we've been through oruro, the sikh temple, the shopping mall. think about this. this is before we got to sandy hook in it. we had a time of absolute carnage in america to see nothing going on in chicago in most urban areas around america. a hundred six homicides in
themselves down. so super storm sandy in the midwest and impact on agriculture, bodleian flyers, the earthquake, tsunami and it clear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake. the list is long and worrying. in 2011, we had more disasters in the united states costing over a billion dollars. in fact, even more disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought is super storm are hugely expensive. so disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity and absolutely with much, much greater cost. so we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists as part tichenor's, with policymakers from the international to the local level, with conservation organization, with corporations and it is our belief that only, i want to emphasize only by working together can we solve these immense challenges that face us. and the costs are not simply financial, but as we tragically know, and many, many lives are lost in these disasters. and so, if we can come up with just one useful idea in the next three days, the benefit, ev
be monitoring, of course the economics comes to bear. we know about hurricane sandy, anybody has an estimate of what the drought of 2012 has cost us so far? the issue is within agriculture alone, the estimate from usda to date is almost $50 billion within agriculture alone. what ends up happening, and don and others could tell you from work done by the national drought mitigation center, is when we ask, well, where are those impacts coming from, the agricultural impacts constituted about 25% of the total number of of reported impacts that we had seen. water resources, energy, wildfire. and one of the things you order in the last discussion and in this one that is the underappreciated aspect of the impacts of drought and air ridty, the loss of ecosystem sources as they support and supply tourism, recreation, clean water and clear air. we do not have any sense of what the costs of those multiple impacts are. we know a bit about the insured impacts from agriculture, but so, therefore, what needs to be considered? the indicators, as margaret is saying, about how people are economically impacted,
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8